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South African Recipes


  



 
South African cooking has its roots in the many cultures that have visited the country over time. Therefore you will find the main dishes include a mixture of Eastern flavours, Western tastes and a healthy dose of bushveld ingredients

  

 

Bobotie recipe

The origins of Bobotie can be traced back to the eastern influence on South African culture. The Cape Malay society are famous for cooking this dish and it is usually served with yellow rice.

Ingredients

1 kg minced lamb
125ml milk
1 thick slice of white bread, crust removed and soaked in milk
2 roughly chopped onions butter
Salt
1 tablespoon of curry powder (mix the hot and the Cape Malay versions for a good flavour)
1 chili, finely chopped (optional and only if you like your food quite hot)
½ cup vinegar
1 tablespoon of lemon juice
1 teaspoon of brown sugar
1 tablespoon of chutney
8 -10 crushed almonds (optional)
3 eggs
1 clove of garlic, crushed and finely chopped
6 bay leaves
1 orange, sliced in wheels
1 lemon, sliced in wheels
Oil for cooking

Instructions on how to make it

Heat the oil in frying pan and add the garlic, onion and curry power. Cook over medium heat for three minutes, then add the mince meat. Fry until the meat is almost done, then using your hands, squeeze the milk from the bread. Discard the milk and add the bread, vinegar, lemon juice, sugar and chutney to the mince. Fry for a minute or so and then remove from heat.
Take a pie dish and place three bay leaves, two wheels of orange and two wheels of lemon at the bottom. Now scoop the mince mixture into the dish. Decorate the sides of the dish with the rest of the lemon and orange wheels, wedging them between the mince and the sides of the dish so that only a third protrudes. If you are using almonds, push them into the mince. Beat the eggs and 125ml milk, and pour over the meat. Put three bay leaves on top of dish. Place the dish uncovered in the oven and cook for about 30 minutes at 160 deg Celsius.

Serve with a plain green salad or chopped tomato and onion, sprinkled with a little vinegar. Make sure you have some chutney near at hand. Serve piping hot with the yellow rice.

 

 

 

Boerewors recipe

Boerewors or Farmers Sausage is a traditional BBQ sausage. There are many secret recipes on how to make boerewors but here we provide you with the traditional recipe.

Ingredients

2 kg of chuck beef (fat and gristle removed)
750 de-boned thick rib of pork
200 g of pork fat (spek)
1 tablespoon ground coriander
2 tablespoons salt
a good pinch of nutmeg
½ cup vinegar
About 90g of pork casings (ask your butcher for some or ask him where you can buy it)

Instructions on how to make it

Cut the meat and spek into small cubes. Sprinkle the seasoning over the meat (not the vinegar Penny), mix well and then mince together. Add the vinegar and mix lightly, but thoroughly. Stuff into casing and refrigerate for 24 hours in a covered, non-metal container.

(Optional: You can experiment by adding additional ingredients. For a lovely curry flavour add a tablespoon of curry powder to the above recipe. For a great garlic flavour add finely crushed and chopped garlic and for a sharper taste add more vinegar).

Do not overcook sausage. About 12-15 minutes over slow coals should do well. Serve with other BBQ dishes like Mealie Bread
 
 

 Chicken Curry Potjie recipe Chicken Curry Potjie (pot) is a great way to be able to entertain and still enjoy a great meal by simply adding all the ingredients into a huge pot over the fire place and leaving to simmer.

 

Instructions on how to make it

Sauté your onions and garlic until soft, then add the spices and let simmer for a couple of minutes. Add tomatoes and tomato paste together with some red wine – simmer for about 5 minutes.

Add chicken pieces and potatoes with a little more wine. Place the lid on your potjie, simmer on a low heat for about 45 minutes, checking the liquid level regularly, adding more red wine when needed. About 15 minutes before you are ready to eat add sugar to taste.

Serve on a bed of rice, cooked together with mustard seeds, turmeric and onion flakes for added flavor
Ingredients

2kg skinless chicken thighs or breasts
3 large grated onions
5 skinless tomatoes
1 large tin tomato paste
4 heaped teaspoons masala
3 bay leaves
2 dessert spoons crushed garlic
1 table spoon coriander
1 teaspoon fennel
2 large sticks cinnamon
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons sugar
1 litre red wine
6 Large potatoes cut in half
 

Oxtail Potjie recipe

A Potjie Kos is a meal cooked in an iron pot over the fire. The way to cook a potjie is usually very slow. Many types of meat can be used for a potjie but here we have chosen one of the favorites - oxtail.

 

Ingredients

2 large oxtails, cut into joints
1/3 cup cooking oil
2 large onions, sliced into fairly thick rounds
6 bay leaves
4 chopped cloves of garlic
4 large carrots, scraped and cut into chunky wheels
the juice of one lemon
6 cloves
a good grind of black pepper
a dash of Worcester sauce
salt
6 potatoes, peeled and halved
1/3 cup of brandy
water to cover

Instructions on how to make it

Heat the oil in the potjie, then brown the meat quickly over high heat with the onion. Add bay leaves, garlic, cloves, lemon juice, salt, pepper, Worcestershire sauce and carrots. Add enough water barely to cover.

Let it simmer away very slowly for four hours, then add the potatoes and the brandy and let it simmer until the potatoes are done and the meat is fall-off-the-bone tender.

Serve with rice, crispy fresh bread and green salad.
 

 
 
Sosaties recipe

Sosaties on the BBQ have never tasted better especially when there is Boerewors on offer too. These kebabs can contain many types of meat (or vegetables) but lamb sosaties seem to always taste the best.

Ingredients

500g boned shoulder or leg of lamb, cut into 25mm cubes
2 large onions, one sliced into rings, the other chopped finely
50ml olive or cooking oil
4 cloves of peeled and crushed garlic
one tablespoon of curry powder
a teaspoon of tumeric
a tablespoon of brown sugar
4 crushed bay leaves
One tablespoon of lemon juice, plus two lemon cut into small wedges
120ml of meat stock
125g packet of dried apricots
One green pepper cut into blocks the same size as the meat cubes
A good blob of butter
Wooden skewer sticks (you can buy them from most supermarkets)

Instructions on how to make it

Place the meat in a non-metal bowl with the bay leaves at the bottom. Heat the butter in a saucepan and saute the chopped onion, garlic and curry powder for a few minutes.

Add the tumeric, lemon and meat stock, bring to the boil.
As soon as the marinade comes to the boil, pour it over the meat.

Allow to cool and place in fridge overnight.

When ready to cook skewer the meat, apricots, green pepper and onion rings onto the sticks.

Pour the marinade into a saucepan, add a blob of butter and salt and pepper to taste, bring to the boil and serve warm with the sosaties and lemon wedges.

To prepare the sosaties you can either grill them under a very hot grill for about 10 minutes, or braai them over very hot coals, turning them as you go along.
Serve with the lemon wedges and for side dishes you can make a bowl of fluffy white rice, potato salad, baked potato or small jacket potatoes and crispy bread to soak up the sauce.

NOTE: If you like hot food, add more garlic, a few crushed chillies, crushed curry leaves and a sprinkling of peri-peri powder to the marinade.
 

Vetkoek recipe
The English have Yorkshire Pudding and the South Africans have Vetkoek! Fill it with mincemeat, cheese or any thing else that comes to hand.

Ingredients

250ml (1cup) cake flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 egg
125 milk
125 ml oil for frying

Instructions on how to make it

Sift flour, baking powder and salt together. beat egg separately and add to flour. Add milk and mix until smooth heat oil in frying pan and drop a tablespoon of the mixture into oil.

Don't make more than four at a time.

Fry for two to three minutes on one side, then turn and fry for one minute on other side. Serve hot.
 

 

 

Koeksisters recipe

The sweet taste of these plaited dough cakes makes them a great favorite in South Africa. The secret of their success, is in preparing the syrup a day ahead and chilling it before dipping the koeksisters.

Ingredients

For the syrup:
1kg sugar
500ml (2 cups) water
2 pieces fresh green ginger (each 5cm), peeled and crushed
2ml (½ teaspoon) cream of tartar
Pinch of salt
Grated rind and juice of ½ lemon

For the dough:
500g flour
2ml (½ teaspoon) salt
30ml (2 tablespoons) baking powder
55g butter, grated
1 egg
250-375ml (1-1½ cups) milk or water

Instructions on how to make it

To make the syrup, put all the ingredients in a saucepan. Heat (stirring) until the sugar has completely dissolved. Cover the mixture and boil for 1 minute. Remove the saucepan lid and boil the syrup for a further 5 minutes, but do not stir it. Remove the syrup from the stove and allow it to cool for at least 2 hours in a refrigerator, or overnight.

To make the dough, sieve together the dry ingredients and rub in the grated butter with your fingertips, or cut it in with a pastry cutter. Beat the egg, add 250ml (1 cup) of the milk or water and mix lightly with the dry ingredients to a soft dough. Add more milk or water if the dough is too stiff. Knead well until small bubbles form under the surface of the dough. Cover with a damp cloth and allow to stand for 30 minutes –1 hour.

Roll out the dough to a thickness of 1 cm, then form koeksisters in either of the following ways:
Cut strips 1 cm wide and twist 2 strips together, or plait 3 strips together, cutting the twisted, or plaited lengths at 8cm intervals and pinching the ends together.

Alternatively, cut the dough into 8cm x 4cm pieces. Cut 2 vertical slits in each piece, reaching to 1cm from the end. Plait the 3 strips that have been formed and pinch together the loose ends.

Heat 7-8cm deep oil to 180-190°C – a cube of bread should turn golden-brown in a minute. Fry the koeksisters for 1-2 minutes, or until golden-brown, then turn them over with a fork and fry until golden-brown on the other side.

Remove the koeksisters with a lifter or slotted spoon, drain them for a moment on paper towel and then plunge them into the cold syrup for 1-2 minutes. Stand the container of syrup in a bowel of ice so that the syrup will stay cold. Remove the koeksisters from the syrup with a lifter or slotted spoon, allowing the excess syrup to flow back into the basin, then drain them slightly on a wire rack.
 

Yellow Rice recipe

Yellow rice is eaten with the Cape Malay dish called Bobotie.

Ingredients

2 cups of rice
¾ cup raisins, soaked in water for 20 minutes, then drained
1 teaspoon of turmeric
a dash of salt
2 sticks of cinnamon

Instructions on how to make it

Place all the ingredients, including the raisins in about 750ml of water, bring to the boil and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes. If there is still excess water in the pot when the rice is tender, pour it out carefully.
Dot the rice with a few blobs of butter and give it a sprinkling of cinnamon sugar (come on Penny, a little sugar and a little cinnamon powder, mixed together).

Cover and keep warm.
 

Traditional Melktert recipe
This is the traditional Duch way and it worth making it the "old fashioned" way if you have the time.

Ingredients

Pastry
62.5ml margarine (1/4 cup)
62.5mll sugar (1/4/ cup)
250ml Self raising Flour (1 cup)
Pinch salt
25ml iced water (2 T)

Filling
500ml milk (2 cups)
1 stick cinnamon
25ml butter (2 T)
50ml sugar (4T)
2 Eggs
50 ml Cake Flour (4T)

Instructions on how to make it

Pastry:
1. Cream the margarine and the sugar together.
2. Work in the flour and salt.
3. Add the water and work to a soft dough.
4. Wrap up and chill until required.

Filling:
1. Scald the milk in a double boiler with the cinnamon stick.
2. Combine the sugar and flour and stir in the hot milk slowly.
3. Return to the heat and cook for 15 minutes with the lid of.
4. Remove from heat and stir in the butter.
5. When cool, add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.
6. Line a 22cm tart plate with the pastry and pour the filling mixture in.
7. Bake at 200 deg C (400 deg F) for 20 minutes.
8. Before serving sprinkle the top with powdered cinnamon and castor sugar.
 

Buttermilk Rusks recipe

This is a traditional yeast-baked rusk - great for dunking in your tea or coffee early in the morning when you watch the sun rise as the boer trekkers did every morning when they traveled from the Cape to the Transavaal. If the rusks are to be kept for a long time, do not substitute margarine for the butter.

Ingredients

375g butter
500g sugar
2 extra large eggs
1,5kg self-raising flour
30ml (2 tablespoons) baking powder
500ml (2 cups) buttermilk or plain drinking yogurt

Instructions on how to make it

Preheat oven to 180°C.

Cream the butter and sugar together very well. Add the eggs, one at a time. Sift the flour and baking powder together, and add this to the creamed mixture, using a fork to mix. Add the buttermilk or yogurt, using a little milk to rinse out the carton. Mix well with a fork and then knead lightly. Pack lightly rolled, golf ball sized buns of the dough into the greased bread pans close together, and bake for 45-55 minutes. Place the pans in the middle of the oven, with a sheet of brown paper on the top shelf to protect the buns from becoming browned too quickly.

Remove the paper after the buns are well risen and cooked through, to brown the tops. Reduce the heat to the lowest possible setting. Turn out the buns on to cake racks, cool them and separate them, using 2 forks. Pack them on wire racks or on cooled oven racks – air must circulate. Place them in the cool oven, leaving the door ajar, for 4-5 hours, or overnight, to dry out.

If no buttermilk or yogurt is available, use fresh milk curdled with lemon juice or white vinegar.
 

Buttermilk Rusks recipe

This is a traditional yeast-baked rusk - great for dunking in your tea or coffee early in the morning when you watch the sun rise as the boer trekkers did every morning when they traveled from the Cape to the Transavaal. If the rusks are to be kept for a long time, do not substitute margarine for the butter.

Ingredients

375g butter
500g sugar
2 extra large eggs
1,5kg self-raising flour
30ml (2 tablespoons) baking powder
500ml (2 cups) buttermilk or plain drinking yogurt

Instructions on how to make it

Preheat oven to 180°C.

Cream the butter and sugar together very well. Add the eggs, one at a time. Sift the flour and baking powder together, and add this to the creamed mixture, using a fork to mix. Add the buttermilk or yogurt, using a little milk to rinse out the carton. Mix well with a fork and then knead lightly. Pack lightly rolled, golf ball sized buns of the dough into the greased bread pans close together, and bake for 45-55 minutes. Place the pans in the middle of the oven, with a sheet of brown paper on the top shelf to protect the buns from becoming browned too quickly.

Remove the paper after the buns are well risen and cooked through, to brown the tops. Reduce the heat to the lowest possible setting. Turn out the buns on to cake racks, cool them and separate them, using 2 forks. Pack them on wire racks or on cooled oven racks – air must circulate. Place them in the cool oven, leaving the door ajar, for 4-5 hours, or overnight, to dry out.

If no buttermilk or yogurt is available, use fresh milk curdled with lemon juice or white vinegar.
 
Biltong Ingredients
 
 
25 lb beef (top round/sirloin/London broil/ eye of round)
4 pints warm water
1 ¼ lb fine salt
½ cup brown sugar
½ cup coriander, coarsely ground
2 tbsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tbsp black pepper, ground
1 cup red wine vinegar
2 tsp saltpeter (optional)

To make the biltong

Cut the meat along the natural dividing lines of the muscles of the meat of choice.

Cut into strips of approximately 2-inch thick and any desired length, always cutting with the grain.

Mix the salt, sugar, bicarbonate of soda, saltpeter, pepper and coriander together.

Rub the seasoning mixture thoroughly into the strips of meat.

Layer the meat, with the more bulky pieces at the bottom, in a glass or stainless steel container. Sprinkle a little vinegar over each layer, as you add them.

South African Biltong. A great taste.
Leave the meat in a cool place for 12 hours or more, depending on how salty you want the meat to be.(Some experimentation may be required to ascertain the correct length of time to let the biltong 'marinade' for, according to your taste.)

Remove the meat from the marinade Mix the water and vinegar and dip the meat into this mixture. This makes the biltong shiny and dark.Once this is complete, the biltong is ready to dry.Pat the pieces of meat dry and then hang them up on S-shaped hooks, or use pieces of string, about 2 inches apart.Hang the biltong in a cool to warm, dry place with an oscillating fan blowing on it.Ensure that the air is dry, as too much moisture will cause the meat to spoil.

The biltong is ready when the outside is hard and the center part of the biltong strip is still a little moist.Let the center dry according to personal taste.

Makes about 21 lb

BILTONG is South African dried meat and has been around for centuries.

Any South African will do almost anything to get a share if he/she knows that BILTONG is available.

Biltong is cut from the "stick" in thin pieces using a very sharp knife. Some people shave off a number of pieces at a time so they don't have to let cutting interfere with eating.A professional trick is to place the biltong in a vice and, using a wood plane shave off as many pieces of the desired thickness as required. Eaten on its own as an appetizer or all day munch. Especially at sporting events, but anywhere is OK.Try it, you'll find it much more addictive than peanuts or potato crisps.

The recipe given above is for beef biltong, but like jerky, biltong may be made using game animals such as Buck and Deer.Ostrich produces a great tasting but somewhat dry biltong.PS. Biltong is not really recommended for unfortunate souls wearing dentures, unless its shaved very thin.

  

     
 

 

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